Tag Archives: After Brexit

What sort of Brexit do YOU want?

photo of Theresa May

Theresa May

photo of Jeremy Corbyn

Jeremy Corbyn

 

So, what sort of Brexit do YOU want? Do you want a Hard Brexit? Do you want a Soft Brexit? What about a Soft and Cuddly Brexit, or perhaps a Thin and Crispy Brexit?

A Warm and Soothing Brexit

We now have a situation where even prominent politicians are talking non-stop nonsense about what sort of Brexit we should have.  Usually on the left they seem to be demanding a Warm and Soothing Brexit – rather like a nice cup of Horlicks that Jeremy Corbyn would have to help him wind down after a hard day’s politicking about how he intends to spend other people’s money.

Any Answers Bleaters

Certainly if you listen to irrepressibly middle class middle-Englanders on Radio 4’s Any Answers, most of them seem to be calling for a Kind and Soothing Brexit where a Lovely European Brexit Omelette gets made without cracking anybody’s free-range eggs.  Wouldn’t it be luverly?

Hard or Soft Brexit? – it’s all nonsense

On the right we often hear demands for a Hard Brexit or maybe even a Vindictive and Vicious one.  Or even a Sod Off Johnny Foreigner Brexit.

But it’s all puerile nonsense!  The reality is less exciting.

We are going into a NEGOTIATION.  And in a negotiation each side seeks to get the best deal they can wring out of the other side.  All I can say is that I’d love to sell my car to one of these people bleating about ‘Soft Brexit’.  They say that under no circumstances should we go into the negotiations saying things like ‘no deal is better than a bad deal’. I know that’s a phrase made famous by that massive Looser May, but I still think it’s the right thing to SAY.

Selling a used car to the ‘Soft Brexiteers’

So I would advertise my car for way over its market value for say £14000.  These kinds of people would turn up, start kicking the tyres and, having told me ‘a bad deal IS better than no deal’, would offer me £10500.  I’d say NO, I want £14000.  They’d then perhaps offer £12900 and I’d still say NO, I want £14000.  And eventually I’d get £14000.

A great deal for me but a shitty one for them!

Landlords and Letting
Affordable Landlord Insurances

 

After Brexit, George gets his P45 – time to reverse anti-landlord taxes?

0sborne_P45

In April this year, a raft of anti-landlord measures came into force – courtesy of George Osborne. There was the increased Stamp Duty hike of 3% on buy-to-let properties and the beginning of the phasing out of interest on buy-to-let mortgages as allowable business expenses for landlords. The latter, I believe, is currently being challenged in the courts.

Now George is gone and Brexit’s here

I for one was pleased that Mr Osborne was given his P45 by Theresa May in the tumultuous weeks that followed our decision to leave the EU. I think he had it coming but maybe that’s just me being spiteful!

Personally, I am pretty sure that although Osborne’s tax changes were sold as help for first time buyers, they were really aimed at giving The City a piece of the buy-to-let pie. This is because some of the legislation specifically excluded large scale investors and of course large financial institutions are not as dependent on borrowed money as are small-time landlords.

Uncertainty is now adversely affecting the property market

The RICS and other institutions are now reporting a significant slowing of the property market following the decision to begin leaving the EU. How long this uncertainty will last is anyone’s guess but it’s a given fact that uncertainty almost always affects markets badly. And since the negotiations are going to be long and complex this uncertainty probably won’t be short-lived. Add to this the fact that, assuming we do get a significant reduction in immigration, demand for housing will slacken. I personally would welcome this, even though it might hurt my pocket, because the UK really is becoming uncomfortably overcrowded and the quality of life really is being affected.

It’s time to reverse Osborne’s tax changes

The phasing out of mortgage expenses as an allowable business expense was an outrage and, whilst I agree with the extra 3% on second or additional homes, it is wholly unjustified to penalise people who buy property to let in this way, and for many it is their main livelihood.

The fact is that Brexit has naturally caused great uncertainty and that uncertainty has caused a slowing in the property market, so I think it would not only be right to reverse Osborne’s outrageous tax changes but it would also be financially prudent.

Malcolm James Stretten

Landlords and Letting – affordable landlord insurances

 

What do YOU think?
[yop_poll id=”1″]