Monthly Archives: July 2016

Can you afford NOT to have landlord rent guarantee insurance?

NightmareTenantsSlumLandlords

Image Copyright Channel 5 – link no longer working

As buy-to-let has increased massively across the UK, partly due to the lamentable return on other kinds of investments, so too have the horror stories of nightmare tenants. First they suddenly stop paying the rent and when the hapless landlord finally evicts them, he or she is faced with possibly several thousands of pounds repair bills.

As a landlord, even if you’ve been lucky enough to avoid these vile people you probably know of others who have fallen prey to nightmare tenants. Just take a look at ‘Nightmare Tenants, Slum Landlords’ on Channel 5 and you’ll see dreadful cases of how a small minority of tenants can make life an absolute hell for small-time landlords.

Landlord Rent Guarantee & Legal Expenses Insurance

Admittedly there are also rogue landlords out there who equally make life hell for their tenants but that’s not what this article is about. This article is in fact about the importance of taking out Landlord Rent Guarantee and Legal Expenses Insurance – rogue landlords don’t need this insurance as they use other rather more direct methods!

In fact, the problem IS rogue landlords because I believe that it’s because of them that the law is absolutely on the side of tenants when it comes to eviction.

Firstly you need to have approved grounds for evicting the tenants, usually non-payment of rent or anti-social behaviour in your property. Then, if they won’t go voluntarily, you need to serve a Section 21 Notice.

And a Section 21 will only be regarded as valid by a court so long as the landlord has properly protected the security deposit and complied with various other procedures that now cover the commencement of any tenancy.

A Section 21 cannot be served during the first four months of tenancy. Once a Section 21 is served the tenants must be given two months notice to quit. If they fail to leave then you need to seek a Possession Order – this can easily add another month and then if the tenants ignore the Order you’ll have to spend more money and time getting bailiffs to physically evict the tenants. And in this case you should always upgrade the Order to the High Court so as to make use of proper bailiffs.

It could easily cost you around £6000.00

So, all in all it could take at least four months to evict bad tenants and often longer! In all that time you will be losing rent and ranking up legal costs. On an average property this could easily amount to well over £6000.00!  And then you will probably have extra refurbishment and cleaning costs to deal with the mess that’s left.

We are agents for Landlord Rent Guarantee & Legal Expenses Insurance, but even if we weren’t, I’d still say that at only £99.95 per property for 12 months’ cover it’s incredible value.

To maintain this low cost, tenant referencing is a condition of this insurance and it’s important to follow the correct procedures relating to taking and protecting the security deposit. If you need more information about this insurance and/or referencing just email us at info@landlordsandletting.co.uk

However, even if the tenants seem nice, strict referencing should ALWAYS be carried out whether you are taking out rent guarantee insurance or not.

What does it cover?

The premium covers your rent up to a maximum of £3000.00 pcm, with a maximum payout of £25000.00 per claim and covers up to five named tenants in the same property. After the first month your rent will be paid per month and our legal team will get to work to evict the tenants as soon as possible and, if appropriate and possible, recover costs to cover damage not covered by the security deposit. You also have the option to have your rent paid without the one month ‘grace’ period – this costs a little more at £129.95 for 12 months.

So, can you really afford NOT to have this insurance?

 

Landlords and Letting  – Affordable landlord insurances

 

 

Block insurance – why you may be being overcharged

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Block Insurance is essentially the overall buildings cover for blocks of flats. It covers risks to the basic structure. Essentially it is bought by the managing agents, the freeholder or whoever has overall responsibility for the block’s structure. And often leaseholders are paying over the odds for it and sometimes they can do something about it.

Can YOU choose who provides your block insurance?

Virtually all flats, whether in purpose-built blocks or conversions, are held in leasehold. The leaseholder has the property for the term of the lease (99 – 999 years) after which it reverts to the freeholder. In between these two parties there is usually a managing agent. Usually it is the managing agent who selects the block insurance for the property.

Sadly, if you have no control over the management of your block it is often the case that the freeholder/managing agent actually know they are paying too much for the block insurance. I’ll leave it up to your imagination why this might be.

Take back control (to coin a phrase!)

However, if you DO have ultimate control over the managing agents then this article may be of interest to you. It’s worth checking that you and the other leaseholders are not paying more than you need to for the block buildings insurance. Certainly if you have a share of the freehold then you should speak to the directors of your residents’ company and check that you and all the other residents are not ‘paying over the odds’ for your insurance.

We offer very competitive rates on block insurances and all the policies are underwritten by major insurers.

Why not get a quote today. Either email info@landlordsandletting.co.uk or call 0800 783 1626, quoting ‘Landlords and Letting’.

Landlords and Letting – affordable landlord insurances

 

 

After Brexit, George gets his P45 – time to reverse anti-landlord taxes?

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In April this year, a raft of anti-landlord measures came into force – courtesy of George Osborne. There was the increased Stamp Duty hike of 3% on buy-to-let properties and the beginning of the phasing out of interest on buy-to-let mortgages as allowable business expenses for landlords. The latter, I believe, is currently being challenged in the courts.

Now George is gone and Brexit’s here

I for one was pleased that Mr Osborne was given his P45 by Theresa May in the tumultuous weeks that followed our decision to leave the EU. I think he had it coming but maybe that’s just me being spiteful!

Personally, I am pretty sure that although Osborne’s tax changes were sold as help for first time buyers, they were really aimed at giving The City a piece of the buy-to-let pie. This is because some of the legislation specifically excluded large scale investors and of course large financial institutions are not as dependent on borrowed money as are small-time landlords.

Uncertainty is now adversely affecting the property market

The RICS and other institutions are now reporting a significant slowing of the property market following the decision to begin leaving the EU. How long this uncertainty will last is anyone’s guess but it’s a given fact that uncertainty almost always affects markets badly. And since the negotiations are going to be long and complex this uncertainty probably won’t be short-lived. Add to this the fact that, assuming we do get a significant reduction in immigration, demand for housing will slacken. I personally would welcome this, even though it might hurt my pocket, because the UK really is becoming uncomfortably overcrowded and the quality of life really is being affected.

It’s time to reverse Osborne’s tax changes

The phasing out of mortgage expenses as an allowable business expense was an outrage and, whilst I agree with the extra 3% on second or additional homes, it is wholly unjustified to penalise people who buy property to let in this way, and for many it is their main livelihood.

The fact is that Brexit has naturally caused great uncertainty and that uncertainty has caused a slowing in the property market, so I think it would not only be right to reverse Osborne’s outrageous tax changes but it would also be financially prudent.

Malcolm James Stretten

Landlords and Letting – affordable landlord insurances

 

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